FAQ's | Dementia Society of America

FAQs

Important Notice: Dementia Society of America (DSA) does not provide medical advice. The contents are for informational purposes only and are not intended to substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. 

The word Dementia can elicit many different reactions, and many of these are unfortunately often based on incorrect information. Getting one’s arms around the definitions and meanings of Dementia terminology can be difficult.

We offer our top 3 FAQs and we want to talk to you about what you are thinking and feeling. Please call us at 1-844-DEMENTIA (1-844-336-3684) to learn more. You may also review our multimedia materials for more information, and discover our programs.

FAQs

 

Our top 3 questions...

 

1. What is Dementia? The simple answer is it's an umbrella term, like "cancer." Cancer is found in different forms, such as: breast cancer, leukemia, testicular cancer, melanoma, etc. It's no different with Dementia, there are many forms and types. 

 

In addition, Dementias are considered severe forms of cognitive impairment that affect at least two functions of the brain. Examples include: memory, decision making, behaviors, muscle motor skills, etc. Memory loss alone does not mean Dementia.

 

2. What is the difference between Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease? Alzheimer's Disease (often shortened to just "AD"), is simply one very common form of Dementia. There are many types of Dementia besides Alzheimer's. Moreover, not all Dementias are diseases or conditions related to Alzheimer's.

 

3. Can an Alzheimer's diagnosis be confirmed 100% while someone is alive? No, not at this time. Today, only a post-mortem autopsy of the brain tissue can reveal with complete certainty the types of pathology that Dr. Alois Alzheimer found over 100 years ago in his patient.

 

The science of brain imaging, DNA testing and other state-of-the-art methods is improving the ability to detect certain tell-tale signs of Alzheimer's Disease. But still, not everyone has easy access to all of the selective research trials and advancements in testing that are possible. Best thing to do is not to assume or rubber stamp a diagnosis. Instead, the Dementia Society of America strongly urges anyone thought to have a cognitive impairment to get the best possible diagnostic work-up by a board-certified geriatric or cognitive neurologist, and his or her team. Search for a medical professional.

 

Please see our Definitions page for more detail on each of the leading forms of Dementia. 

 

Do you have additional questions that you would like answered? If so, please contact us.

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Dementia Society of America - PO Box 600 - Doylestown, PA 18901

Dementia Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Telephone 1-800-DEMENTIA (1-800-336-3684)

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Last Updated

November 2019